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#9435196 Apr 27, 2014 at 06:45 AM
Member
2130 Posts
Welp, Teleios closes a gap in one of my characters' background. Was wondering how the people who made her would get access to such biological and genetic knowledge.
#9546386 May 23, 2014 at 11:47 PM
72 Posts
#8669737 Lord Liaden wrote:

#8637867 Lord Liaden wrote:

Coruscations of Power: In the worldwide accidental cataclysm which devastated the alien planet Ashraal centuries ago, and gave birth to the awesome cosmic villain Xarriel, discreet bursts of energy from the main explosion were cast across space and time, emerging in random locations in the space-time continuum. To date at least five of these "coruscations of power" have appeared on or near the Earth in recent years, and affected humans in their vicinity, creating the supervillains Photon, Stareye, Sunspot, and Vector, and the superhero Victory.

The coruscations can manifest as bursts of light from space, but in the past have been mistaken for solar flares or lightning storms. Powers induced by them can, but not necessarily must, include various forms of energy projection, flight (usually very fast), mind-affecting abilities, enhanced physical strength, speed, and durability, and the ability to survive in hostile environments (even space).

Xarriel is fully detailed in Champions Beyond, while the other villains mentioned are in the Champions Villains trilogy, and Victory in Champions Universe.



#8639666 Stellar wrote:

Wow, this is actually really awesome to know! I've been really slack with giving a definitive answer as to where my character Stellar's powers actually come from, except that she was randomly "struck by a falling star" that gave her her powers of being able to control light, fly, move at super human speeds and project cosmic energy. The "Coruscations of Power" seems very applicable to her. I may actually use that! Thank you!!



I'd like to offer a character concept I invented for my own use of Xarriel, which you might consider for character background or role-playing purposes, or if you want to create a nemesis for Stellar. Although it's not official lore, it is based on and extrapolated from it; and it's highly unlikely that anything official will be added for Xarriel anytime soon.

The eruption of cosmic energy that spawned Xarriel also wiped out the billions of inhabitants of the planet Ashraal; but Xarriel used his godlike power to resurrect them, now as his utterly obedient slaves. He did have to leave a few of them with a certain amount of free will so they'd have the initiative and imagination to carry out his plans. All of the preceding is taken directly from Champions Beyond.

What left me feeling a little dissatisfied was the lack of any specified minions for Xarriel, especially of the super kind. His PnP stats are so overwhelmingly powerful, only the mightiest of super teams could hope to stand against him; but without lesser-powered servants, that limits his use only to really high-level games. Besides, if he's the setting's analogue to Darkseid, IMO he would be more interesting if he had servants comparable to Darkseid's Elite.

It occurred to me that if Xarriel's Coruscations of Power could bestow superpowers on beings across the galaxy, perhaps some of them came to rest in the bodies of the deceased Ashraalians. If that happened, when Xarriel resurrected them, would some of them wield the same sorts of powers?

That led me to invent The Lightbearers, Xarriel's cadre of super lieutenants, who lead his troops, execute and supervise his plans, and act as enforcers against those who displease him. (The Latin translation of "lightbearer" was the source of the name, "Lucifer.") The published characters who owe their superhumanity to Coruscations of Power provide examples of the abilities Lightbearers could possess.

One way I thought to use the Lightbearers, would be for Xarriel to send some of them to track down the other superbeings in the galaxy who received fragments of his power, to either persuade or compel them to serve Xarriel, or if that proved impossible, to kill them and deliver their power to their master for bestowel on more loyal servants.


I've been recently thinking of ways to take campaigns into the Galactic stage, likely using Xarriel as a catalyst master villain for PCs to oppose, but couldn't come up with a good idea of how for a while (as you said, he's unfathomably powerful and he's got very, very little official material dedicated to him). This may have just instantly solved my problem.
#9547215 May 24, 2014 at 07:10 AM
1156 Posts
EOIT, Hatman, IonutRO, thank you for saying this info helped you. That's gratifying to know -- it's what I was hoping for. :)
#9947255 Aug 30, 2014 at 11:12 AM
1156 Posts
Discussion elsewhere on these forums has persuaded me to add another category to this thread (and my initial post), one which is relatively common in the CU but which many players might not think to explore.

"Divine" Intervention: In the Champions Universe, all the gods and demons of myth and religion that humans still remember actually exist. Although very powerful in their home astral dimensions, a metaphysical barrier called the Ban prevents them from manifesting on Earth with their full power. But there are a few ways divine beings can create lesser-powered Earthly agents to champion their causes.

One of these ways is to infuse some of their power, and sometimes personality, into a deserving human host, creating a superhuman reflecting the qualities of his or her patron deity. Quite a few official Champions heroes and villains have been empowered in this way. In keeping with comic-book origin conventions, their empowerment typically comes under unusual and dramatic circumstances, often at a key turning point in the life of the hero. For example, the first Johnny Hercules was given an amulet by an "apparition" of Zeus when the circus he worked for toured Greece, containing the "Hercules Force," the power of Hercules as a demigod which he abandoned when he became fully a god. The Nigerian hero Ogun gained power over metal after being beaten near to death by criminal thugs, when he received a vision of the Yoruba god of the forge of the same name.

Ogun is thoroughly detailed in Champions Worldwide, while the current Johnny Hercules is featured in the PDF book The Hercules Force, available from the Hero Games website store. Much more on CU gods and the Ban can be found in The Mystic World.
#9948025 Aug 30, 2014 at 03:12 PM · Edited 3 years ago
597 Posts
#9947255 Lord Liaden wrote:

Discussion elsewhere on these forums has persuaded me to add another category to this thread (and my initial post), one which is relatively common in the CU but which many players might not think to explore.

"Divine" Intervention: In the Champions Universe, all the gods and demons of myth and religion that humans still remember actually exist. Although very powerful in their home astral dimensions, a metaphysical barrier called the Ban prevents them from manifesting on Earth with their full power. But there are a few ways divine beings can create lesser-powered Earthly agents to champion their causes.

One of these ways is to infuse some of their power, and sometimes personality, into a deserving human host, creating a superhuman reflecting the qualities of his or her patron deity. Quite a few official Champions heroes and villains have been empowered in this way. In keeping with comic-book origin conventions, their empowerment typically comes under unusual and dramatic circumstances, often at a key turning point in the life of the hero. For example, the first Johnny Hercules was given an amulet by an "apparition" of Zeus when the circus he worked for toured Greece, containing the "Hercules Force," the power of Hercules as a demigod which he abandoned when he became fully a god. The Nigerian hero Ogun gained power over metal after being beaten near to death by criminal thugs, when he received a vision of the Yoruba god of the forge of the same name.

Ogun is thoroughly detailed in Champions Worldwide, while the current Johnny Hercules is featured in the PDF book The Hercules Force, available from the Hero Games website store. Much more on CU gods and the Ban can be found in The Mystic World.



I have two characters empowered that way via the Zoroastrian faith. As Zoroastrianism is an abstract faith with very undefined if not abstract pantheon, having deites and semigods in person doesn't really fits its religious canon. Empowering mortals was the best option.

Both characters were empowered by the yazatas with the flame of Atar, which is Zoroastrian element of Truth and Justice so it basically forces characters to act as heroes. If they do not behave like heroes and do not actively impose said values (Humata, Hukhta, Huveshta: “to think good, to speak good, to act good.”), their powers will go away.
#10939356 Apr 16, 2015 at 11:41 AM
1156 Posts
It's not my desire to necro any threads, but recent discussions have reminded me of another CU-based origin which fits the parameters of this thread -- unique to the Champions Universe but not requiring characters with unusual backgrounds. And since I created this thread as a general lore repository, it seemed the appropriate place to add this info, both here and to the list on the first post. :) So, without further ado:


Martial-Arts Temples: For centuries, hidden enclaves have existed in the Far East where dedicated monks have practiced the most advanced physical and spiritual martial-arts techniques, including virtually superhuman abilities for those with the skill and determination to master them. The most legendary of these sites among knowledgeable martial artists are Yengtao Temple, somewhere in the mountains of China; and the city of Shamballah, in a cave beneath a mountain in the Himalayas. Both sites are hidden from the outside world both physically and magically, so that only those already highly disciplined in body and mind can find them. But those who do can study almost any martial art that has ever existed, and perhaps achieve abilities like the heroes of legend.

Various students at Yengtao Temple have returned to the outside world to become heroes, or villains. In the present day the Millennium City superhero Nightwind, his bitter rival Jade Phoenix, and the Hong Kong hero Golden Dragon Fist, all learned their extraordinary skills and ch'i powers from Yengtao. Jade Phoenix was responsible for the destruction of Yengtao Temple and murder of the monks in 1996, but there may be other former students alive in the world. And Shamballah, second only to Yengtao as a repository of mystic martial-arts secrets, still stands.

But Shamballah also guards a dark secret even further beneath the mountain: its evil twin city, Agharti, prison of the Dark Monks, also extraordinarily skilled but utterly corrupt. While the Shamballans prevent the Dark Monks from escaping, they don't forbid outsiders from visiting the city, or leaving afterwards.

The story of Yengtao Temple, and description of some of its unique techniques, appear in Champions Universe. Shamballah and Agharti are described in considerable detail in Hidden Lands.
#11159852 Jun 11, 2015 at 07:01 PM · Edited over 2 years ago
1156 Posts
Once again, a forum discussion topic has reminded me of another CU-based origin which is appropriate to add to this thread (and has been entered in the list on the first post).


Vandaleur Bloodline: Founded a thousand years ago by their immortal progenitor, Adrian Vandaleur, this widespread clan of sorcerers is one of the premier occult dynasties in the Western world. Although the majority of Vandaleurs have no more talent for magic than most people, the gift for spell casting is far more common among them than in the general populace; and their ranks include some of the most powerful mages in the world.

Members of the family are aware of each other, and sometimes cooperate, sometimes conflict. But Adrian Vandaleur, whose power dwarfs that of his kin, keeps any factionalism from descending into violence. Otherwise individual Vandaleurs are free to follow whatever activities they like. Their personalities and morality vary widely. Some are benevolent, even heroic; others are amoral and ruthless, up to megalomaniacal psychopaths. Most are simply concerned with their own interests.

Any Vandaleur with magical ability and desire to develop it could find family members able and willing to train him. The Vandaleur family are described in detail in Champions Villains Vol. 2: Villain Teams.
#11637872 Oct 15, 2015 at 09:06 AM · Edited 2 years ago
1156 Posts
Yet again, discussions with a fellow forumite has reminded me of another potential CU-based character origin, which I've already added to the main list on this thread.



Alien Gene-Tampering: Superhuman powers resulting from aliens mucking with Human DNA is a well-established comic-book trope. On Champions Earth the Qularr are one likely candidate. The main reason the Qularr invaded Earth in the first place was so they could study the Human genome on a large scale, to understand why and how Humans manifest superpowers with greater frequency and average power than nearly any other species, including the Qularr. They hope to engineer that capacity in themselves. At least one experiment along those lines has yielded a super-powered Human/Qularr hybrid, although by accident. It's highly likely other similar experiments are being conducted by Qularr currently on Earth, or perhaps on Humans kidnapped and brought back to Qularr space.

What virtually no one knows is that one reason Humans do manifest powers more often, is because that genetic potential was placed in them by incredibly ancient and advanced aliens called the Progenitors. Two million years ago the Progenitors advanced the evolution of Humanity's ancestor species to the next stage of sapience. Half a million years ago they experimented on Homo erectus, creating the first of the ageless superhuman Empyrean race. Champions Universe suggests they might also be responsible for the creation of the Birdpeople of Thaar twelve thousand years ago.

In any case, the Progenitors still exist, continuing their experiments and periodically monitoring the progress of past ones. It's not unreasonable to assume that they would do some "followup" work on Human DNA.

You can read much more about the Qularr and Progenitors in Champions Beyond.
#12277709 Apr 13, 2016 at 12:21 AM · Edited 9 months ago
1156 Posts
I've noticed that no few Champions Online players, and CORPers, eschew four-color superhero characters in favor of more morally-dubious mercenaries, vigilantes, even outright villains. For such characters the setting has another well-established origin source, which in addition to posting below I've added to the list on this thread's first post.


Professional Armorers: One of the staples of the superhero genre is the gadget-using super, with no actual super-powers but employing equipment made of special materials and/or incorporating advanced technology. Most comic-book heroes build their own gadgets, or have them designed for them by benevolent patron inventors or agencies. Some heroes acquire prototype devices by accident, including "liberating" them from their villainous makers (often earning them pursuit by the vengeful villain). But it's not unheard-of in comics for a scientist -- usually one of criminal bent -- to sell his technological services to whoever will pay.

In the official Champions Universe there are several possible sources of scientific expertise for hire to aspiring supers. Most of these are considered criminals by most world law-enforcement, so don't typically contract with anyone of obvious heroic bent who might cause them trouble. But for another criminal, or a mercenary or vigilante of grey morality, they're often the route to quick super status.

Millennium City is the home base of Wayland Talos, a brilliant inventor with a pathological hatred of superheroes. To strike back at them he supplies villains with everything from questionite hand weapons, to energy blasters or jet packs, to full suits of powered armor. He's considered one of the underworld's premier armorers, with few individual competitors. One of those competitors is known as Brainchild, a telepathic gadgeteer who primarily supplies tactical and technical support to other criminals, rather than take the risk of committing his own crimes.

On the international front, the Warlord is a powered-armor villain and would-be conqueror who's also a major dealer in high-tech armaments, and who has created super-class weaponry and armor for individuals for the right price. The unscrupulous corporation called ARGENT does a thriving business in service to criminals; not just supplying gadgetry, but even physically augmenting a person through bionic implants or experimental biochemical treatments. The independent city-state of Larisagrad was once a center for the USSR's classified scientific research, including advanced weaponry, and experiments to create true superhumans. After the collapse of the Soviet Union and thus their funding, the scientists of Larisagrad chose to freelance to the highest bidder.

The only truly benign inventor engaged in remotely similar activity is named Ralph Polarewski. Formerly the full-time technical supervisor to the famous Sentinels superhero team, Ralph left them after a bitter argument with the team's leader. He's become a well-known freelance contractor to members of the superhero community who use gadgets but have no technical skills of their own. As written he primarily works for people already established as heroes (and would never sell his services to someone of questionable morality), but would be well able to supply an equipment-based origin to someone who could convince him of their sincerity and dedication.

ARGENT and Larisagrad are described in Champions Universe. The Warlord and his organization are fully written up in Volume One of the Champions Villains trilogy, while Brainchild and Wayland Talos get the same treatment in Volume Three. Ralph Polarewski is detailed in the book, Everyman.
#13083135 Feb 22, 2017 at 08:55 AM · Edited 9 months ago
1156 Posts
And yet again, a discussion elsewhere on these forums has reminded me of a distinctive Champions Universe origin appropriate to this thread, which I've added to the list in the first post.


DEMONic Experiments: One of the classic superhero origins is the person unwillingly subjected to villainous scientific experiments who uses their newly-gained powers to escape. In the CU quite a few official supers came about that way, particularly due to actions by VIPER and ARGENT. But DEMON, the worldwide supernatural villain org, often conduct their own magical analogues to scientific research, which have spawned magical superhumans.

One official villain, named Riptide, was a young runaway girl before a member of DEMON found her and turned her over to his Morbane. The Morbane attempted a magic experiment to bind the girl to a water elemental, hoping to create a strong but mentally pliable minion. But Riptide's crazed fear at what was done to her was now backed with elemental powers, enabling her to force her way to freedom. The supervillain now called Morningstar was the result of a tactic that DEMON often uses since it became estranged from the rulers of Hell: forcing a summoned demon to temporarily occupy the human body of a DEMON Brother, giving the Brother a measure of demonic power but with the human personality in control. For unknown reasons, Morningstar's possession proved permanent. He fought DEMON's enemies for some time, under enchantment to ensure his loyalty, until a battle with magical heroes severed the control spell and returned his free will. Morningstar left DEMON to become an independent supervillain. (Both characters are detailed in Champions Villains Vol. 3.)

Another villain in the service of DEMON, Professor Samedi, was a minor DEMON member, and lackluster musician, before his Morbane had him try to play an enchanted fiddle the Morbane had acquired. Samedi found he could cast several potent spells with the fiddle's music, but it changed him physically, making him look almost skeletally gaunt; and changed his personality, to more actively, confidently malevolent. So there's precedent for a Morbane to have one of his disposable minions "test drive" a magic item. Perhaps a given item would change the wielder's personality in a more positive way. (Prof. Samedi is detailed in DEMON: Servants Of Darkness.)
#13101279 Mar 02, 2017 at 07:09 AM
18 Posts
All this information is great, and very inspiring, which drives me to one question and one observation.

First is my alien Speedster/Bioelectricity manipulator, Charge. A member of a lesser known humanoid sentient species of the Milky Way Galaxy who happened to be a head engineer on his species' FTL engine experiments. His basic origin is that there was a serious malfunction in the prototype of the engine, which exploded, shredding said unlucky alien bloke into molecular goop. But the side-effect was, that the energy of the blast (perhaps using some form of radiation unknown to humans) mutated the resulting goo, basically creating a bioelectric creature that can control the molecular bindings (electrons etc.) to grant himself a semblance of electrokinesis. One fo the side-effects is his ability to manipulate the electro-magnetic forces to make himself superfast.

I was thinking if a coruscation of power could be used as a catalyst of both the FTL engine going ka-boom, as well as the mutation of the being that would become Charge.

Secondly, everyone's favourite pistol-wielding Archmage is said to have come into his mystical powers because of his acquisition of an artefact known as the Flame Gem.

Is there any write-up on other such Gems in existence and any description of the Flame Gem in any particular detail?
@mauler00 in-game, happy to RP or just chat away!
#13102461 Mar 02, 2017 at 04:45 PM
1156 Posts
#13101279 Mawlah wrote:

All this information is great, and very inspiring, which drives me to one question and one observation.

First is my alien Speedster/Bioelectricity manipulator, Charge. A member of a lesser known humanoid sentient species of the Milky Way Galaxy who happened to be a head engineer on his species' FTL engine experiments. His basic origin is that there was a serious malfunction in the prototype of the engine, which exploded, shredding said unlucky alien bloke into molecular goop. But the side-effect was, that the energy of the blast (perhaps using some form of radiation unknown to humans) mutated the resulting goo, basically creating a bioelectric creature that can control the molecular bindings (electrons etc.) to grant himself a semblance of electrokinesis. One fo the side-effects is his ability to manipulate the electro-magnetic forces to make himself superfast.

I was thinking if a coruscation of power could be used as a catalyst of both the FTL engine going ka-boom, as well as the mutation of the being that would become Charge.



If you really want it to be, I see no reason why not. However, malfunctioning prototype devices causing superpowers is a very common super origin, in the Champions Universe and the mainstream comics universes. It doesn't really need further justification. I guess I would want to know what using a Coruscation would add to the character as you want to play him, that you can't get with just the ka-boom of the experimental FTL drive.

#13101279 Mawlah wrote:

Secondly, everyone's favourite pistol-wielding Archmage is said to have come into his mystical powers because of his acquisition of an artefact known as the Flame Gem.

Is there any write-up on other such Gems in existence and any description of the Flame Gem in any particular detail?



The following is from Champions Universe p. 92:

One of the mystic items Robert Caliburn owns is the Flame Gem, which is one of the four Elemental Gems. Despite their name, they’re not associated with the four Aristotlean elements, but instead with the Four Elements of Mankind: the Earth from which he was made; the Soul that God gave him; the Flame of his intellect and creativity; and the Chaos that so often resides within his heart. Caliburn doesn’t know who owns the Soul Gem or Chaos Gem (if anyone — both were last mentioned in chronicles from the Renaissance and may still be lost). The owner of the Earth Gem is an old enemy of his: Cairngorm, the archdruid of a malefic human-sacrificing cult from the British Isles.

Like Caliburn, anyone who owns a Gem is vulnerable to attacks from the other Gems. Each of them is “attuned” to the others (especially its opposite [Fire- Earth, Soul-Chaos]), and this allows more of the force of an attack to affect the target.

Individually, each of the Gems holds great power — Caliburn has only barely begun to unlock the might within the Flame Gem, and only in the most basic way of literally enhancing fire-based magics. Were one man to obtain all four Elemental Gems, he would wield ultimate power over the Four Elements of Mankind, and thus over Men. Caliburn (and other right-thinking folk) want to prevent this, since placing such power in the hands of a fallible Man would lead to havoc, destruction, and evil. But he would like to know where they are so he can keep tabs on them.


During the Vibora Bay Apocalypse storyline in Champions Online, Robert Caliburn took the Earth Gem from Cairngorm. While he had it Cairngorm apparently unlocked much more of its power than Caliburn did that of the Flame Gem. Champions Villains Vol. 3 p. 64 extensively describes the abilities Cairngorm derived from the Earth Gem, as for his PnP version. I'll transcribe a few excerpts here (trying to stay within Fair Use of the IP):

Cairngorm has a wide variety of powers, making him a flexible and dangerous opponent. First, the Earth Gem has enhanced his magic generally, making him a formidable super-mage... Most of his spells have a “druidic,” “nature,” or “earth” special effect of some sort...

Second, the Earth Gem has given him two related sets of powers. At its most basic level, it allows him to manipulate the earth and soil... More fundamentally, the Earth Gem grants its possessor control over “human clay” — a person’s flesh and bones, in other words.

... The Earth Gem... [has] been attached to Cairngorm’s body for so long that it’s now a part of him (it could only be removed with a combination of surgery and mystic rituals). In fact it’s “infused” his body with the power of earth, making his bones as tough as rock and his flesh as durable as the ground. As a result he’s highly resistant to injury and can survive various conditions that would kill normal people.
#13103040 Mar 03, 2017 at 12:54 AM
18 Posts
I think my need for using something aside from the mutating ka-boom, was just that I forgot that comicbook logic is more forgiving on people having their inventions explode in their face.


As to the Gem, thanks for the information. While I hardly imagine using the remaining to for a character origin, it sounds like they could perhaps make for great McGuffins to center an RP event or story arc around. Perhaps depending on the willing suspension of disbelief, the event could be about someone trying to snatch all the gems, (I can't see it very likely given how the Magnum Mage is a lean, mean, spellcasting machine thanks to his new job description, but the idea is there.)
@mauler00 in-game, happy to RP or just chat away!
#13103704 Mar 03, 2017 at 07:18 AM
1156 Posts
Even Dr. Strange has had his Eye of Agamotto stolen more than once by a clever, skilled super-thief. And the CU definitely has those.
#13410376 Aug 24, 2017 at 09:53 PM · Edited 3 months ago
1156 Posts
Now that the PDF of Hero Games' latest Champions source book, Golden Age Champions, for supers gaming set just before, during, and just after World War II -- including a great deal of information about the official Champions Universe during that period -- is available for purchase, I can inform you of another unique character origin source described in that book, letting you create supers with almost any abilities who are not only tied to the setting, but to a cultural and family tradition of heroism. The following has also been added to the first post on this thread.

------------------------------------------------------

Golden Age Legacies: In the real world the earliest comic-book superheroes appeared starting in 1938, and continued to be created over the course of World War II. Champions Earth's first actual superhumans also began to appear during this period. Most of those heroes eventually retired, to be replaced by newer generations; but often those newer heroes were inspired by their predecessors, in many cases even to the point of adopting their code names as an homage. Most such "legacy heroes" were either the relatives or proteges of the originals, or sought their blessing to carry on their names. However, certain lineages originating in the Golden Age have been particularly fertile in continuing to produce new heroes to uphold the family tradition.

In the winter of 1939 Kiril Lenskii was a young officer in the Soviet army serving in his country's war against Finland. Badly wounded in an attack that wiped out the rest of his unit, and overcome by the severe winter cold, Lenskii collapsed unconscious over underground caverns which released strange gasses. As they entered his lungs his body began to change. He awoke to discover that not only was his body healed and stronger than before, but he was now immune to the cold, and could even create intense cold, snow, and ice over limited areas. Given the code name, General Zima ("winter"), over the course of World War II Kiril Lenskii became the Soviet military's leading superhero, and remained so for many years.

The three sons of fisherman and former naval sailor Morimoto Takashi (by a mysterious woman who may have been a supernatural spirit) were each born with extraordinary abilities: enormous strength and durability (Ichiro); incredible speed (Jiro); and probability manipulation (Saburo) manifesting as phenomenal luck for himself, and phenomenal misfortune for his opponents. The three young men were recruited by the Japanese government to fight their country's foes, first China in the 1930s, and later the Americans and their allies during WW II. They were among Japan's most prominent superhuman champions during and after the war.

Each of the three Morimoto brothers had more than one superhuman offspring, while all seven of General Zima's children developed super powers. Today there are over two dozen "super" members of the extended Morimoto family, and descendants of General Zima, active in their respective homelands. It would be reasonable to expect a few of their relatives to have emigrated to other countries at some point.

Although the histories of these characters don't explicitly state it one way or the other, there's no reason to assume superhumans from their lineages necessarily manifest the same types of powers as their ancestors. The mutations of all three original Morimoto brothers were radically different from each other; while General Zima's origin implies his abilities resulted from his body adapting to a specific environment.

The full write-ups for General Zima and the Morimoto brothers appear in the latest edition of Golden Age Champions (for Hero System Sixth Edition).
#13462656 Sep 29, 2017 at 11:18 PM
10 Posts
When it comes to Coruscation of Power, how would that tie into a character who becomes bonded to an entity? For instance, my character Maelstrom is a fire-based hero with a phoenix (essentially identical to Jean Grey/Phoenix/Dark Phoenix), and I'm still trying to figure out how that would work. The phoenix itself is meant to be quasi-cosmic, quasi-magical (a 'blurred lines' type where its really both).
#13462684 Sep 29, 2017 at 11:56 PM
1156 Posts
Hmm... as written the CoP don't carry sentience, so an "entity" would be tricky to explain using them. Just from your description, that kind of power in-setting sounds most like a Firewing, but the chance of a non-Malvan achieving that status is slim.

If I might suggest, rather than diverting this thread, how about starting a new topic in the Brainstorm sub-forum? If you could provide more details about your character concept, the circumstances of the "bonding," what this "entity" is like, and where you want to take the character, that would give all of us more to work with. 😌
#13491314 Oct 20, 2017 at 02:24 PM
1156 Posts
As big as the new Golden Age Champions is (300 pages), not everything author Darren Watts came up with could fit into it. Golden Age Champions Secret Files is a separate PDF with forty pages of outtakes from the manuscript of the main book: more background info, adventure outlines, and ten additional full character write-ups. One of those characters in particular caught my eye for his potential for contemporary character origins. Technically this could fall under my previous category addition, "Golden Age Legacies," but IMHO this one is so distinctive that it deserves its own entry. I've added it to the first post on this thread.
_________________________________________

The Vita-Man Clan: Percy Yates was born in Los Angeles in 1910. Brilliant but sickly throughout his youth, he studied biology, chemistry, and nutrition to find ways to improve his own health. In 1939 he discovered a compound which when administered in a pill had a miraculous effect on him, transforming his body to one of perfect health and exceptional physical vigor. Further experimentation led to additional pills granting him true super-powers, including X-ray vision, invisibility, flight, growth to giant size and strength, or shrinking to the size of a mouse.

Yates's discoveries had two major drawbacks. Their effects were only temporary -- his main vitalizing pill lasted about an hour per dose, while his additional abilities endured for only a minute. Yates was also unable to make them work for anyone else -- they interacted with his own unique physiology. Nonetheless he used his new abilities to fight crime under the costumed identity of Vita-Man. Vita-Man was recruited by the Drifter as one of the founding members of the Justice Squadron superhero team, protecting the west coast of the United States during WW II.

Percy Yates's health continued to deteriorate over time, leading to his retirement as Vita-Man in 1948, and his death in 1964. But in the intervening years he learned that several of his family members shared the biological factors which would allow them to use his empowering treatments. Today half a dozen of his kin are using "variations of his discoveries" (wording suggesting that other powers are possible).