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#13649051 Feb 10, 2018 at 12:20 AM
4 Posts
Does the lore make mention how young supers training gets handled in other countries? Specifically I got a character from Germany whose background I'd like to flesh out a little more.
@Menesh_Elvar

Gabriel Technologies Inc.
#13649290 Feb 10, 2018 at 04:04 AM · Edited 3 months ago
1229 Posts
I'm afraid the lore is silent on that specific issue. However, I can transcribe what the Champions Universe source book says about CU German attitudes toward superhumans in general.

"Germany’s exploitation of superhumans in World War II led to a general distaste for the subject that remained through the early Eighties. The German media rarely said more about superhuman activity than it absolutely had to, and the government’s official policy about superhumans was to ignore them as much as it could. This began to change as old memories faded and the people began to see the benefits of having superheroes around. Since 1991 the government has required the registration of superhumans under a policy similar to that of Great Britain, and has often granted temporary (but never permanent) sanction to superheroes in appropriate situations." (CU p. 49)

"Most other [European] nations have some form of superhuman registration, but follow the leads of Great Britain and Germany in using the carrot instead of the stick... Registration isn’t mandatory in either nation, but without it a superhuman cannot receive any sort of government sanction for his activities and will be prosecuted for any laws he may break (as well as being fully financially responsible for any property damage or other liability he creates)." (CU p. 77-78)

"As noted on page 49, the Germans have traditionally been a little reluctant to talk about their relations with superhumans. Today they remain comparatively rare in German society, though that seems to be changing as the public becomes more accepting of them. The best-known German superheroes include Mondfeuer (“Moonfire,” an elementalist mystic), der Bogenschütze (“the Archer,” who uses a high-tech bow and trick arrows), and Zeitgeist (“Spirit of the Times,” a low-powered chronomanipulator). Panzer (a well-armed powered armor character with plans to restore Nazi rule to Germany), der Schwarze Tod (“the Black Death,” a disease inflictor), and Neutron (who can vastly increase his own density and strength) are some of the villains native to Germany." (CU p. 79)

There's also the note on Champions Worldwide p. 7 that a few attempts have been made to create a pan-European superhero team under the auspices of the European Union, but nothing concrete has come of them to this point. "Several European superheroes have worked together on an informal basis in the past and remain on good terms in case of emergency. Chevalier of France has traveled to several other countries, and has worked with Germany's Geschwindigkeit ("Velocity," a speedster) as a surprisingly effective team. Similarly, Mondfeur (an elemental mystic from Germany) and Fortuna (a luck-manipulating mystic from Italy) have been seen together dealing with occasional mystic threats..."
#13649307 Feb 10, 2018 at 04:13 AM
1229 Posts
Another possibility for training for a super in Europe is L'Institut Thoth, an international organization based in Switzerland. From CU p. 122: "The purpose of the Institut is to study all aspects of paraphysics, both the good and the bad, so as to increase human understanding of a profoundly human subject."

"To support the Institut, they also established a consulting role for it. Governments interested in exploring paraphysics issues, superhumans looking for insights into their powers (or cures for debilitating conditions), and other such clients pay hefty fees for the Institut’s considerable expertise. The fees are always based on ability to pay, rather than a flat-rate scale, but the Institut insists on receiving its money in advance as a retainer (a necessary precaution, given some of the people it deals with). Part research institute, part think tank, part hospital, the Institut plays an intriguing role in the Superhuman World — despite the fact that none of its directors or employees are themselves superhuman."

"Additionally, the Institut takes a limited number of students each year, most of them college graduates pursuing Ph.D degrees. The students pay tuition, either on their own or through various scholarships established by governments, businesses, or charities who work closely with the Institut."
#13649385 Feb 10, 2018 at 06:03 AM
4 Posts
Thanks a lot. That gives me some insights to work from.
@Menesh_Elvar

Gabriel Technologies Inc.
#13681007 Mar 05, 2018 at 07:38 AM
1229 Posts
I apologize for the thread necro, but there's another option for supers training which completely slipped my mind until now. 😴 P. 137 of UNTIL: Defenders Of Freedom, which describes UNTIL's official hero team, UNITY, mentions that "UNITY has a training program for young superhumans, some of whom will no doubt join the team eventually while others return to their home countries." The description of the program is very brief, and makes no mention of how a super accesses it; whether he or she has to be sponsored by their home country, or can be a private citizen; whether UNTIL actively recruits for the program, or people apply themselves; if a private citizen has to pay for this training; or what ongoing commitment UNTIL may or may not expect from a trainee. It's also unclear whether "young superhuman" includes actual minors, or just inexperienced.

I don't expect any official source to clarify any of those points for the foreseeable future. The good part of that is you can fill in the blanks however would work best for you, with little fear of contradiction. 😈